Verizon Apparently Cancels Its Frequently-Delayed Streaming TV Service

 

Verizon Apparently Cancels Its Frequently-Delayed Streaming TV Service

After several delays in the launch of its very own streaming TV service, Verizon has now dropped the launch of the service. Verizon has been working on launching its own streaming TV service, which could compete with similar services in the market, such as YouTube TV, Dish’s Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and DirecTV Now. This […]

After several delays in the launch of its very own streaming TV service, Verizon has now dropped the launch of the service. Verizon has been working on launching its own streaming TV service, which could compete with similar services in the market, such as YouTube TV, Dish’s Sling TV, PlayStation Vue and DirecTV Now.

Verizon Apparently Cancels Its Frequently-Delayed Streaming TV Service

This project has been regularly delayed several times over the last couple of years, and the last target launch time for the project was set in the sprint 2018 as reported by Bloomberg. The first to report about the new change in course was Multichannel.

According to a report from TechCrunch, published in January, the company has decided to offer themed channels (including sports, news, entertainment, etc.), each as a separate and standalone app. This strategy seems noticeably different than the current field of OTT services, which show some resemblance in options for TV programming to traditional cable television services. However, it’s pretty sensible when we understand that the CEO of Verizon, Lowell McAdam is not a fan of conventional TV viewing and earlier this week in an interview with Yahoo, he said, “I have said this several times, I think the linear model is dead. It will just take a long time to die.” Probably, his FiOS team hoped that the latter is true.

So, the company is not going to continue with its idea of building a new product. Instead, Verizon may partner with an existing OTT service, which isn’t specified yet, and contribute its content from different Oath brands. Lowell McAdam also said in the interview, “Till the time we roll out our service in the fourth quarter, we will have partnered with a current service and by integrating our Oath assets into our partner’s linear assets we’ll bring the combined package to customers.” “So, we expect it to be a big hit from the perspective of customers.”

Back in year 2014, Verizon consented to purchase the technology and IP behind an over-the-top TV service which was created by Intel but it was never launched. After that, Verizon has been trying to ink content deals. According to a last year’s report by Bloomberg, Verizon was struggling to wrangle together content for the planned service betwixt internal disagreements and executive turnover over the extensive plan for streaming television service.

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