Verizon’s Oath revises its privacy policies of Yahoo and AOL to allow photo and email scans

 

Owned by Verizon, Oath Inc. – the parent company of AOL and Yahoo – has revised its privacy policies; updating new information regarding what the company can do with the data it collects from users. According to the recent updates of company’s privacy policies, the websites that the company owns, can scan instant messages, emails, photos as well as user information. Also, according to the privacy agreement, the company may also share the users’ data with the parent company of Oath, i.e., Verizon.

Verizon

Prior to acquisition of the company by Verizon, the privacy policy of AOL didn’t disclose anything about the collection of user information. Well, that doesn’t imply that it never occurred, but nothing was formally mentioned by the company in its privacy agreements about the process. On the contrary, Yahoo did mention that the company stores and analyzes all communications content, including the email.

One more thing that should be noted about the privacy policy of Oath is its section about banking information. As per the reports of CNET, the company, allegedly, scans emails pertaining to financial and banking details. Additionally, as per their terms of service, which disclose that Oath Inc. may “… user content around certain interactions with financial institutions.”

Another necessary information about an important change in policies that Yahoo users should know is that anti-arbitration agreements of Oath has extended to Yahoo too. So, now, it will make more difficult to sue the organization if users feel that there has been an invasion of their privacy.

Interestingly, Oath new policies have raised many queries from users and reporters, who are worried about privacy in the recent case of Facebook scandal involving Cambridge Analytica. At the time of publication of this article, Oath has released an official statement which says, “There are no such concerns which their users need to worry about.”

With the launch of unified Oath terms of services and their privacy policy is the main stepping stone towards creating what’s next for our end users while authorizing them with various controls and transparency over in what way and when their data is being used by Oath.”

In general, this news isn’t completely out of context in the year of 2018, but it’s always great to read such privacy agreements.

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